Click here to view the Winter 2015 Course Website

 


LABMP 590: Technology and the Future of Medicine

CCIS L1-140, T R 2:00 - 3:20 pm

A lecture and seminar course describing the future effects of technology on medicine in both the developed and developing world, the promise and perils of biotech, nanotech, and artificial intelligence, and changing character of research and practice of medicine and pathology in the coming decades, and the technological singularity. Each student will carry out a project supervised by a faculty member and give a presentation. This course is designed for graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, or Arts, and is open to undergraduates in those Faculties with consent of Department.

      Click here to view a recently published paper regarding the course,

written by Kim Solez, MD.

Lecture video from Fall 2011 CPL Course
A Biological Repairmen's Reflection on the Coming Singularity

 

 

Updates

Videos from faculty and student presentations in the course can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/user/
kimsolez .

 

Article about the course The "magic" behind analytics:
http://www.troymedia.com/
2013/02/13/the-magic-behind-analytics/

 

Article about the course on Faculty of Science website.
http://www.science.ualberta.
ca/FacultyofScienceNews
/2012/August/Scientistsand
StudentsSeek
Singularity.aspx 

 

 

             The Sea, Sutures, and the Almighty in LABMP 590 (Technology and the Future of Medicine)
 


Teaching our course on tech and health futures

Are visionary young surgeons perfecting their sutures, 

A young AI researcher making smart artificial limbs,

And a young physicist studying crises of particle spins.


Although tech is the focus, nature abounds

As we discuss octopi, dolphins, and whale sounds,

Navigating by the stars,

And ethics of robot avatars.


And who knew a course on Tech and Future of Medicine

Could fit in discussion of beliefs of the bedouin!


Dimitry Itskov says tech ideas did not spread in the past.

Because of the absence of the spiritual repast.

So we bring you a feast of diverse views on medicine

Spirit, inspiring tech, a new salon in Edmonton!


Gertrude Stein's Paris had nothing on us.

Edmonton enlightenment now made manifest!

By Kim Solez, M.D.

 

 


Links to Handouts and Background Readings

Course Syllabus

Course Outline

Course Description

Lecture Schedule

September 1, 2015

September 3, 2015

September 8, 2015

September 10, 2015

September 15, 2015

September 17, 2015

September 22, 2015

September 24, 2015

September 29, 2015

October 1, 2015

October 6, 2015

October 8, 2015

October 13, 2015

October 20, 2015

October 22, 2015

October 27, 2015

October 29, 2015 

November 3, 2015

November 5, 2015

November 17, 2015

November 19, 2015

November 24, 2015

November 26, 2015

December 1, 2015

 

 

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For further information:
 Rongjia Liu          or            Kim Solez, M.D.

780-407-8385 banffap@ualberta.ca                      780-710-1644 Kim.Solez@Ualberta.ca


LABMP 590 Technology and the Future of Medicine

«3 (fi 6) (second term, 2-1s-0).
A lecture and seminar course describing the future effects of technology on medicine in both the developed and developing world, the promise and perils of biotech, nanotech, and artificial intelligence, and changing character of research and practice of medicine and pathology in the coming decades, and the technological singularity. Each student will carry out a project supervised by a faculty member and give a presentation. This course is designed for graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, or Arts, and is open to undergraduates in those Faculties with consent of Department.
 
“Technology and the Future of Medicine” – Course Synopsis
Kim Solez, M.D.
 
This interactive seminar discussion course for graduate students in the sciences, medicine, and the arts takes an even handed approach to the influence of technology on the future of medicine. The objective of the course is to provide a balanced idea of the promise and peril of technology in medicine and to instill the idea that we are not passive victims of the future, but with appropriate education can actually help shape the future in positive ways.
 
The course debates both the promise of elimination of disease by technology and the possibility that a host of new diseases will be brought about by technology.  It also considers the future influence of technology on the have nots in the world who have yet to make their first phone call.  The technological Singularity and possible “merger” of humans and machines are considered along with the idea that “the future is already here, it is just not uniformly distributed”.  The ways in which technology has already changed pathology, medicine and medical research will be covered, as well as the likely changes in medicine over the next decades.  Existential risks and likely medical advances in the areas of biotech, nanotech, and artificial intelligence will be considered.
 
The course will be taught in a highly innovative way by faculty coming from a variety of different disciplines and backgrounds. Each 90 minute class period on Tuesdays and Thursdays will be divided up into 60 minute lecture, and 20 minute whole class discussion. Each student will take on a special project of their own with guidance by the faculty and present the results of that special project in the latter portion of the course.  While designed for graduate students, the course may also be taken by science or arts undergraduates with permission of the instructor, and it may also be used for continuous professional learning by faculty and staff.
 
The course will be self-contained, the basic background for understanding the concepts would be taught to the students within the course, so that their varying educational background would not inhibit full participation in the course.
 
Students will be evaluated on their presentation on their chosen project in the course (30%) (live or as video), a paper on that project (40%), a multiple choice and short answer mid-term examination on the basics of the subject matter in the course given around the seventh week of the course (20%) and class participation (10%). Most readings in the course would be articles available online or provided as pdfs.  The two books used most in the course will be Ray Kurzweil’s The Singularity is Near (2005, read selectively) and Simon Baron-Cohen’s Zero Degrees of Empathy (2011) but purchase of these is not required.
 
 

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Approved by the Royal College of Physician and Surgeons as a self accredited round. Participants can claim the hours they attend under Section 1 accredited rounds in the Royal College's MOC program.

Subjects Include:

  • Promise and Perils of Biotech  

  • Global Citizenship and Technology  

  • Entrepreneurship in Medicine/Innovation

  • Reflections on Singularity University 

  • Evil As A Treatable Disease

  • Promise and Perils of AI 

  • Writings as a Technology in Medicine and Science  

  • Promise and Perils of Nanotech  

  • New Tools and Discoveries in Science

  • Transmission Electron Microscopy of Subcellular Compartment Storage Disorders

  • Tumor Cell Scaffolding and Anti-Cancer Therapy

  • Genomics and The Future of Medicine

  • The Singularity and The Have Nots        
    Ethics After The Robots Take Over   
    The Technologic Singularity Explained&Promoted!
    Complementary medicine/healing
    (Consumer practices and the example of Canadian First Nations medicine)  
    The Future of Pathology (What will pathology practice be like in 2020)
    A Biological Repairman's Reflections on the Coming
    Singularity: Notions of Embodiment in the Age of Spiritual Machine
    Second Life and Medical Education 
    Neuroscience/Universal Consciousness

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Last Modified: Sunday January 03, 2016 03:19:43 PM kim.solez@ualberta.ca